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Man, Aryeh

Man, Aryeh


Son of Serena Bella (nee Zilberberg from the city of Iasi) and Menachem Mendel (Manola) Mandelowicz of Bucharest. Aryeh was born in Bucharest, Romania, on the 29th of Heshvan 5623 (28.11.1932). His name was Leo (Lunko), a younger brother of Dorothea (Dorit) Rene. Leo’s father owned a shop and a workshop to manufacture stainless steel surfaces and ovens for kitchens and restaurants, and the mother was a housewife. Leo studied in Bucharest at the Kultura School, a Jewish elementary school, and went on to a Jewish high school. This was after the Romanian authorities prohibited Jews from attending Christian or mixed schools. At the beginning of World War II, the family underwent relative security, thanks in large part to the family of Menachem Mendel, who fought in the Romanian army (and was wounded during the First World War). In 1942, the family moved to another apartment nearby, and during the bombardment of Bucharest, the family left the apartment and moved to the father’s workshop, as there was a large shelter nearby After the war ended, Leo joined the Hanoar Hazioni youth movement, and on December 25, 1947, he left Bucharest with a group of young boys They were members of Hanoar Hazioni on their way to Eretz Israel and traveled by freight train southward, crossing the Danube on Raphael Where he met his sister, Dorothea, who was also on her way to Eretz Israel, and on December 29, 1947, the group, including the brother and sister, left the port of Burgas on the deck of the Pan York ship to the port of Haifa. By the British who acted against the illegal immigration to Palestine, and its passengers were transferred to Cyprus. Two days after their departure from Bulgaria, the immigrants were transferred to Camp 60 in northern Cyprus, one of the “summer camps” established by the British near Famagusta. The immigrants stayed in the camp for two and a half months. On March 16, 1948, they were brought aboard the ship “Dolores” and sailed to Haifa. From Haifa they were transported by armored British buses to Binyamina, and from there they were transferred to tents in the immigrant camp in Ra’anana. When they arrived in Israel, the brothers’ names were changed to Hebrew names. Leo was the Aryeh, and Dorothea was Dorit. After a few days in the Raanana immigrant camp, Aryeh said goodbye to his sister. He was sent to Nahalal together with the “Hanoar Hazioni” group with which he immigrated to Israel, while his sister was sent to Kibbutz Tel Yitzhak. Shortly after their separation Dorit was seriously injured while working in a munitions factory on the kibbutz, and as a result was hospitalized for two years. The relationship between the brothers, which was always deep and special, became very intense in those days, and all their lives there was a love between them. In the course of time, the brother and sister kept the matter secret from their parents who remained in Romania, but when the secret was discovered, the parents immigrated to Israel. In Nahalal Aryeh studied in the agricultural school until his enlistment in the army, Arie joined the Nahal Brigade in 1949 and joined the Nahal Brigade. They were the founders of a kibbutz (now Moshav) Talmei Yaffe in the south, near Ashkelon. During his military service, Aryeh passed a course with paramedics. After his discharge from the IDF, Aryeh remained in the kibbutz, where he worked as an accountant (as treasurer of the kibbutz) and in agriculture (collecting fruit trees), and in 1954 Aryeh began his studies in correspondence to complete his matriculation certificate. In 1957, Aryeh was admitted to medical studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he lived in the “Zionist Youth Farm” in Jerusalem, where he served as a youth instructor and teacher of mathematics for the MoslemsD. In 1959 Aryeh passed his last name. Mendelovitch decided to shorten the name and chose the family name – Mann. In the Zionist youth farm, Arie met the initiator Kochba, the eldest daughter of Moshe and Sarah Kalumiti from the city of Izmir in Turkey. In October 1962 the two married in Tel Aviv. Towards the end of his medical studies, Arie made the practical training (internship) at Tel Hashomer Hospital in the Internal Medicine Department (Pavilion 38). Aryeh completed his medical studies in 1965, and later worked as cardiologist at the cardiac rehabilitation department at Tel Hashomer. At the same time taught at the nursing school. Kochba and Aryeh raised three children together: Idit (Ella), Mirit and Oded. The couple lived a life of loving relationships, full partnership and supportive and deep friendship with mutual consideration, appreciation and respect. Aryeh was an exemplary husband and father, a son and a loving and devoted brother, a kind man with a sense of humor and wide horizons. He was always attentive to the other and could give good advice when needed. As a physician, Aryeh excelled in his ability to discern excellence and creative and original medical thinking, and he was able to reassure and give each and every one his full attention. At the same time, he was humble, considerate and humane – and so many of his patients testified. He was a source of inspiration for many of his friends and patients, and the influence of what he taught and said remained deep in the hearts of his students at the nursing school and his colleagues at the hospital, attesting to the esteem and reverence that enveloped his name, even years after his fall. In 1967, during the Six-Day War, he served as a military doctor on the southern front, and in 1973, during the Yom Kippur War, Aryeh served as a military doctor in Sinai. , Aryeh continued to serve in active reserve duty for about six months, and Dr. Aryeh died on the 18th of Adar 5734 (March 12, 1974). He died suddenly on one of his vacations from reserve duty. Forty-one years old. Aryeh was laid to rest in the cemetery in Holon. He left behind a wife, two daughters and a son, a mother and a sister. Aryeh’s daughters chose therapeutic subjects. Beyond his longings for pain, he feels a sense of missing out on his absence as a model and inspiration for them in his special therapeutic way, which was ahead of her time, especially in the realm of institutional medicine – his holistic understanding of the patient as a person, body and soul. Before her death in 2002, Kochava wrote about her husband Aryeh, and her words attest to their great love and mutual respect: “In his death he left a void and a lack of many people for whom he was a supporter, both medically and emotionally. The most prominent of all, Aryeh would love a man wherever he was, and the love of men to him would be rewarded “

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