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Moshinsky, Moshe (Monique)

Moshinsky, Moshe (Monique)


Moshe, son of Jacob, was born in 1927 in Poland, in the city of Chikocin, and grew up in his hometown On the eve of World War II, Poland became the focal point of world Jewry in the fields of religious, national, political, social and cultural activities. The economic crisis that gripped the world at the end of the 1930s influenced the agriculture of Poland and exacerbated the anti-Semitic sentiments and pushed the feet of the Jews, who were considered to have a key position in economic life, suffering from an anti-Jewish economic boycott and growing pogroms. September 1, 1939, World War II broke out with the German invasion of Poland and its conquest of the war of contempt The following months, anti-Jewish decrees and regulations were issued that resulted in the social isolation of the Jews, their economic deprivation, and the undermining of their entire life systems.In the following months the Jews were concentrated in the ghettos and later deported to concentration and extermination camps. Moshe was murdered in September 1942, when the rest of the community was sent to the Treblinka death camp, and since then the place was located A forced labor camp. A German concern operated weapons factories in three different factory camps. Most of the prisoners were brought from Poland and a few were from Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Holland and France. The total number of Jews employed in forced labor in the camp was estimated at 30,000, of whom about 23,000 perished due to the terrible conditions, the cruel abuse and the murders. At the end of July 1944 a selection was carried out in the camp, and the survivors were transferred to various camps. Moshe was sent to the ghetto in Czestochowa, Poland, where he also worked hard in armaments factories. Later Moshe was sent to Germany. At first he stayed in the concentration camp near Nordhausen, where he was transferred to the Stendar camp near Gardelagen. In March 1945 there were 34,500 prisoners in the camp. At the beginning of April 1945, the Nazis began evacuating the place, and most of the prisoners were sent to Bergen-Belsen. Thousands were murdered during the evacuation. When the American Army arrived, shortly thereafter, only a few prisoners remained in the camp. One of those released was Moshe. After the liberation, Moshe lived in a DP camp, acquired the profession of a driver’s mechanic and looked up to a Jewish homeland. He joined the Betar movement in Poland, and as a member of the movement immigrated to Israel in 1948. As soon as he arrived, Moshe joined the Irgun (National Military Organization of the Betar movement) and joined the 51st Battalion of the Givati ​​Brigade, “In which many Irgun fighters were assigned after its dissolution. In the battalion he was trained as a machine gunner. In preparation for the declaration of the establishment of the state and the expected Egyptian invasion, Moshe’s battalion was taken southward, prepared for the progress of the Egyptian army, and contributed an important part to the braking battles, especially in the “detachment belt.” When the first truce broke out, on June 11, 1948, the 51st Battalion was assigned to occupy Hill 113, which was one of the most important positions of the invading Egyptian army and one of the most fortified compounds in the Egyptian system that cut off the Negev from the rest of the State of Israel. At the end of the lull, on the night of July 9, 1948, the 51st Battalion conquered and established the village of Tel a-Safi. At the same time, his men were forced to evacuate Hill 113, since the Egyptians seized positions at the intersection of roads south of it. Ten days later, when the second truce came into effect, the fighters of the 51st Battalion were transferred to the outposts in the Negba district, whose fighters bravely stood up to the great attack on the kibbutz. In October 1948, Moshe participated in the conferenceFollow “Yoav”. The Egyptian detachment strip, which was based in the Iraqi-Suweidan police area, isolated the Negev and seriously endangered the few settlements there. Due to the serious political implications of excluding the Negev within Israel, Israel initiated Operation Yoav. On the night of 16/16 October 1948, Givati ​​fighters stormed on hill 113, north of Metzudat Yoav, which controls the Ashkelon-Kiryat Gat road, and conquered it. Thanks to this, they won the title “First Bounty Regiment,” and the hill was called “Arnon Hill” after the fallen sergeant. In this attack, on the 17th of Tishrei, 5749 (October 17, 1948), Moses fell. Twenty-one years old. Moshe was laid to rest in a mass grave in the military cemetery in Kfar Warburg. On the combat page of the Givati ​​Brigade, dated October 21, 1948, it was noted that Moshe’s name would be borne in memory of a Bren machine gun from the enemy’s fleet – “Moshe” Bren. With the consolidation of Givati ​​fighters in the outposts in the area of ​​Hill 113, the first stage of the breakthrough to the isolated Negev was carried out. In a difficult and bitter battle, the fighters captured Hulikat outposts (now the Heletz region), thus breaking the Egyptian strip of detachment and forming a connection to the Negev, which was part of the nascent State of Israel. This hero is a “last scion”. The survivors of the Holocaust are survivors of the Holocaust who survived the last remnant of their nuclear family (parents, brothers, sisters, sons and daughters) who experienced the Holocaust in the ghettos and / or concentration camps and / or in hiding and hiding in territories occupied by the Nazis and / Or in combat alongside members of the underground movements or partisans in the Nazi-occupied territories who immigrated to Israel during or after World War II, wore uniforms and fell in the Israeli army.

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