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Arazi (Rubinstein), Moshe

Arazi (Rubinstein), Moshe


Son of Esther and Mordechai-Yitzhak, was born on May 15, 1909 in Warsaw, the capital of Poland, to a Zionist family and attended the “Tarbut” school. In 1922 he immigrated to Israel with his parents who settled in Neve Shalom (on the Jaffa-Tel Aviv border). In Israel, he attended the Alliance School and helped his parents work in their shredder. Member of the Haganah. From 1929 to 1932 he was a member of the Hanoar Haoved movement and was active in the section committees and in organizational matters. He spent three years doing training at Kibbutz Ein Harod, and from June 1935, he joined Kibbutz Na’an, where he lived for 14 years, and commanded the local Hachash, and was a member of HaPoel. Active in raising illegal immigrants. He participated in the redemption of the land of Couscous-Tivon, and with the rise of 11 points in the Negev, he was called to command one of the points and did a great deal of fortification for the days of the test. In Naan and the “Black Sabbath” June 29, 1946 When the British searched for weapons in many settlements, he was arrested along with Na’an members and detained in Latrun and Rafah. When a company was recruited from Palmach to combat positions, In the Givati ​​Brigade. He did much to raise the rank of his company and served as a model for his men, as a fighter and commander, and won important victories in a short period. Was among the conquerors of Mughar and Beit Daras, and took part in the evacuation of the children from Nitzanim – a task that touched his soul – and when he succeeded, his face glowed with happiness. He was blue-eyed and broad-shouldered, tanned, and his forehead furrowed-a rocky figure, yet so human in his smile, in his attitude. He loves the work of the field, is a fighter and a fighter, alert and dedicated. The worker and the fighter merged into one. He was aware of the danger of this, because he understood that his behavior as a commander affected the fighting spirit of his men. Indeed, he influenced them from his peace of mind and his inner confidence during the most dangerous hours. In particular, he encouraged his men during the harsh air raids on Negba. On the night of May 21-22, he participated in the third attack on the Iraqi-Suweidan police, was wounded in his hand when the barbed-wire was breached – and did not announce it, in order not to make the difficult withdrawal difficult. At the same time he was hit by an enemy bullet near his Lev. His last words before his death at Bilu Hospital were: “Treat others, the more severely wounded – -” and there he died on May 22, 1948. He was laid to rest at the cemetery in Na’an. He left a wife, a boy and a daughter, and Kibbutz Na’an took out a file in his memory.

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